Higher Achievement Program, Inc.
4009 Fitzhugh Ave.
Suite 200
Richmond VA 23230
Mission Statement
Talent is everywhere - in every Richmond neighborhood - but opportunity is not. We envision a city where every student’s potential and promise is realized regardless of his or her circumstances. Higher Achievement closes the opportunity gap during the pivotal middle school years. By leveraging the power of communities, Higher Achievement’s proven model provides a rigorous year-round learning environment, caring role models, and a culture of high expectations, resulting in college-bound scholars with the character, confidence, and skills to succeed.

Founded in 1975 in Washington DC as a grassroots effort to create learning opportunities for children in low-income neighborhoods, Higher Achievement was invited in 2009 by the Richmond Public School Superintendent and School Board to become part of the solution to improving local middle school outcomes by helping Richmond's motivated, yet at-risk, middle school students in great economic need and navigate them to a path of academic success. Our role is to demonstrate that remarkable academic achievement is possible by all students, regardless of their families' income level, when provided with out-of-school-time academic opportunities.  Through our Summer and Afterschool Academies, scholars develop academic skills, behaviors and attitudes to help improve their grades, standardized test scores and attendance, which prepares them to be on track for advanced high school programs and ready for college.

At a time when grades and test scores usually decline, our program yields results. 96% of 8th grade scholars are accepted into top high school programs and 93% of alumni graduate from college.

Web and Social Media
Video
Multi-Media Comments
To view additional photographs of our scholars as well as keep updated with our events, 'Like' us on Facebook!
 
To see our Achievement Centers in action, join us for a tour! Contact Kia Johnson at kjohnson@higherachievement.org or 804-643-7753 to schedule this wonderful opportunity.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Tyren Frazier
Board Chair Mitchell Schear
Board Chair Company Affiliation Vornado/Charles E. Smith
Contact Information
Address 4009 Fitzhugh Ave.
Suite 200
Richmond, VA 23230
Telephone 804 643-7753
Fax 804 643-7755
E-mail info@higherachievement.org
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1975
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expense Bar Graph - All Years
Expense Breakdown Bar Chart - All Years
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,865,936.00
Projected Expenses $1,833,231.00
Statements
Mission
Talent is everywhere - in every Richmond neighborhood - but opportunity is not. We envision a city where every student’s potential and promise is realized regardless of his or her circumstances. Higher Achievement closes the opportunity gap during the pivotal middle school years. By leveraging the power of communities, Higher Achievement’s proven model provides a rigorous year-round learning environment, caring role models, and a culture of high expectations, resulting in college-bound scholars with the character, confidence, and skills to succeed.

Founded in 1975 in Washington DC as a grassroots effort to create learning opportunities for children in low-income neighborhoods, Higher Achievement was invited in 2009 by the Richmond Public School Superintendent and School Board to become part of the solution to improving local middle school outcomes by helping Richmond's motivated, yet at-risk, middle school students in great economic need and navigate them to a path of academic success. Our role is to demonstrate that remarkable academic achievement is possible by all students, regardless of their families' income level, when provided with out-of-school-time academic opportunities.  Through our Summer and Afterschool Academies, scholars develop academic skills, behaviors and attitudes to help improve their grades, standardized test scores and attendance, which prepares them to be on track for advanced high school programs and ready for college.

At a time when grades and test scores usually decline, our program yields results. 96% of 8th grade scholars are accepted into top high school programs and 93% of alumni graduate from college.

Impact

When comparing the first quarter to the last quarter of Higher Achievement Richmond scholars’ grades and test scores, we are pleased to report the following academic outcomes:

Academic progress:

 

  • 76% of scholars showed positive Math gains
  • 82% of scholars showed positive English/language arts gains.
  • 70% of scholars increased or maintained proficient Math SOL.
  • 73% of scholars increased or maintained proficient Reading SOL
  • 66% of scholars had zero unexcused absences

Based on Higher Achievement’s history of results in Washington, DC, we anticipate that 93% of Richmond scholars who complete the four-year program (first cohort in 2014) will graduate from high school (in 2018) and go on to college. Our scholars’ commitment clearly shows their motivation to be on track for college by the eighth grade and our mutual belief that intellect is built through effort.
Needs
1. Sustained financial support: Higher Achievement's Richmond launch was partially seeded by a multi-year investment from Altria that allowed us to establish a strong program, develop trusting relationships with families and educators, cultivate a broad funding base, and build meaningful partnerships with RPS and fellow non-profits.  We have been vigorously cultivating and pursuing additional corporate, foundation, and public investments.  
 
2. People: A key component of Higher Achievement's success is our mentoring program.  Higher Achievement mentors are role models with varied backgrounds that are passionate and committed to the success of our scholars.   
 
3.  Volunteer Leadership: Advisory and Young Professional Board members are champions of, advisors to, and investors in Higher Achievement.    
Background

Founded in 1975 in Washington, DC as a grassroots effort to create learning opportunities for children in low-income neighborhoods, Higher Achievement has impacted the lives of more than 10,000 young people, and currently operates achievement centers in Washington, DC, Alexandria, VA, Baltimore, MD, Pittsburgh, PA, and Richmond, VA.

In 2009, the Richmond School Board invited Higher Achievement to become part of the solution to improving local middle school outcomes in Richmond by helping motivated, yet at-risk, middle school students in greatest economic need navigate a pathway to academic success and on to high school, college and career. After 18 months of due-diligence which ensured the community would be able to support the program both financially and with volunteer academic mentors, Higher Achievement launched its Richmond program in June 2011 with 120 scholars (and a waiting list on the Northside). Higher Achievement is considered the more rigorous after-school and summer program for students who want to go to college and are willing to work hard to get there, regardless of their current grades or test scores.

Higher Achievement's model of rigorous academic mentoring, intensive individualization of service and comprehensive academic support is based on more than 35 years of experience in Washington, DC and guided by leading research for effective out-of-school time programs. The organization was named a winner of the 2010Coming Up Taller Award, given by the President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities and presented by First Lady Michelle Obama at a White House ceremony. Higher Achievement’s partnership model was highlighted as a best practice by the Harvard Family Research Project, and the organization’s focus on preventing summer learning loss was featured in anMSNBCspecial report,Making the Grade.Most recently, Higher Achievement was a winner of the Afterschool Alliance and MetLife Foundation’s Afterschool Innovator Award in 2011

Areas of Service
Areas Served
Area
Metro Richmond
Richmond, City
Henrico County

At the request of partner school districts in Richmond and Henrico County, our achievement centers are based in middle schools that have high academic need, serve high percentages of youth and families that earn well below the poverty level, and have school leadership willing to partner and collaborate. Higher Achievement currently serves 265 students combined at Binford, Boushall, Henderson and Wilder Middle Schools. In June 2016 we added two new centers, one at Binford in the city of Richmond, and one at Wilder Middle School, in Henrico County.  We serve 6th, 7th and 8th graders from these schools as well as 5thgraders from surrounding elementary schools. All schools are Title I schools with almost 100% of students eligible for Free and Reduced Meals.

Board Chair
Board Chair Mitchell Schear
Company Affiliation Vornado/Charles E. Smith
Term Sept 2012 to Aug 2018
Email info@higherachievement.org
Board of Directors
Board Members
NameAffiliation
John Boochever Oliver Wyman
Mark DeBord Altria
Douglas Donatelli Community Volunteer
Rick England Farrell Advisory, Inc.
David Farrell FTI Consulting
Nicole Gallant United Way of NYC
Swata Gandhi DAP Products, Inc
Lamont Gordon The Posse Foundation
Michael Kagan Concentric Energy Advisors
Chris Leech Mckinsey & Company
Annie Linehan Czerwinski Formally with City Bridge Foundation
Joshua B. Rales The Norman and Ruth Rales Foundation
Sherry Rhodes Community Volunteer
Mitchell Schear Vornado/Charles E. Smith
Raj Sharma Censeo
Gary Thompson Reed Smith, LLC
Tariq West Community Volunteer
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 2
Caucasian 12
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 1
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 14
Female 3
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Board Development / Board Orientation
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Program / Program Planning
Other Boards
The tables below contain information about other groups that advise this nonprofit on operations and projects.
Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Heidi Abbott Hunton & Williams
Andrea Archer Altria
Neil Bellamy Tredegar Corporation
Mark DeBord Altria
Sarah Gravitt-Baese
Nyah Hamlett
Stacy Haney ReedSmith
Taylor Keeney
Rob Martin Cherry Bekaert
Dr Willie McKinney Capital One
Fred Morton
Mary Lloyd Parks Community Volunteer
Dr. Dietra Trent
Sandra Wheeler Richmond Public Schools
Comments
Because Higher Achievement has grown nationally as one 501(c)3 organization, the Richmond affiliate is governed by a National Board of Directors. We continue to build a local advisory body in Richmond, the Advisory Board. Advisory Board members are champions of, advisors to, and investors in Higher Achievement Richmond. They serve as advocates for middle school achievement in underserved neighborhoods. Members hold high expectations of Higher Achievement scholars and support their academic success by leveraging financial and in-kind resources, assisting with mentor recruitment, creating access to opportunities for scholars, advising the Executive Director, and opening doors for the organization.The Advisory Board meets as a group five times per year.
Executive Director
Executive Director Mr. Tyren Frazier
Staff
Full Time Staff 17
Part Time Staff 8
Volunteers 200
Plans
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 1
Management Succession Plan? Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Collaborations

Higher Achievement has developed rich partnerships to best serve our scholars during Afterschool Academy and Summer Academy:

 · Richmond Public Schools and Henrico County Public Schools: A signed three-year Memorandum of Understanding with the District Superintendent and School Board outlines the partnership,including: use of classroom and school facilities,in-kind scholar transportation,custodial services,curriculum sharing and alignment,electronic sharing of grades and test scores,and mutually-beneficial family engagement efforts.

· Communities In Schools (CIS): A partnership with CIS facilitates assistance with school personnel relationships, scholar recruitment referrals,program partner recommendations, collaboration on student behavior management and family engagement strategies.

· Elective partners: Higher Achievement partners with local organizations such as Visual Arts Center, YMCA, Lobs & Lessons  and NextUP RVAto provide elective classes for our scholars. Many of our scholars would not have the chance to take part in these activities outside of Higher Achievement.

· Universities: Partnerships exist with the University of Richmond's Bonner Center for Civic Engagement,Robins School of Business and WILL programs,and VCU's Division of Community Engagement with regard to recruitment of summer teachers,volunteer mentors,and staff.

Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Coming Up Taller AwardPresident’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities2010
Enterprise AwardCatalogue for Philanthropy2008
National Winner of the Excellence in Summer Learning AwardJohn Hopkins University2006
Excellence in Nonprofit Management AwardWashington Post2005
Mentor Program of the YearVirginia Mentoring Partnership2014
Programs
Description

Summer Academy (June - August): For six weeks, Monday-Thursday, 8:00am - 4:00pm, 5th– 8thgrade scholars will be taught math, science, social studies, literature, and an elective, such as music, art, or sports. Scholars will be exposed to curricula, correlated to national and state standards, of the grade level they will be entering in the fall. As a result, their effort will not only combat summer learning loss, but also strengthen areas of weakness while pushing them to new heights academically. Scholars will enter their new grade with confidence and familiarity with the coursework ahead. Scholars will also be steeped in our culture of spirit, respect, excellence, and collaboration with a behavior management system that helps scholars, staff and volunteers uphold these principles.

Scholars will also participate in field trips that expose them to experiences outside their immediate neighborhoods (past field trips have included: learning the inner-workings of the Federal Reserve Bank and touring the Junior Achievement Finance Park). A highlight of Summer Academy is an overnight college trip to help scholars learn that college is a viable option, discuss the expectations of going to college, what it takes to get there, and to begin imagining their lives as college students. They will sleep in campus dorms, eat in dining halls, attend lectures with college professors, and talk with current students about available majors and career paths. Past college trips have included William & Mary, George Mason, VCU, Virginia State, North Carolina Central, and Duke University.

Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Description
Afterschool Academy (October - May): For 27 weeks, three evenings per week, 3:00 - 7:30pm, 5th – 8th grade scholars will receive homework coaching, an elective, dinner, and two hours of intensive small-group academic mentoring in math, literature, and self-selected seminars such as Fun with Math, Financial Literacy and conflict resolution. They will also experience opportunities to develop public speaking and leadership skills during daily Community Meetings, where scholars will debate a word and quote of the week and share their solutions for the math problem of the week with their fellow scholars and mentors. Scholars will also exhibit their growing academic confidence and public speaking skills during special events such as the Geography Challenge, Love Out Loud poetry competition, and the Center Ambassador competition. 

Every week during Afterschool Academy, each scholar will work with three different mentors for a total of 150 hours per school year, who will: 1) provide high-quality academic instruction using Higher Achievement’s curriculum, 2) build scholar character by demonstrating positive behavior and professional and personal success, and 3) foster the community’s role in contributing to the education of young people in greatest need. By offering opportunities for scholars to meet and build relationships with positive role models, mentors help scholars stay in school, avoid risky situations, find positive alternatives to negative behavior, and develop a sense of resiliency. Prior to the beginning of Afterschool Academy, mentors will receive comprehensive training, which covers approaches to advancing youth development and building successful relationships with middle school youth, and effective methods for delivering the Higher Achievement curriculum, which they download and review prior to each weekly lesson.
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Short Term Success

Higher Achievement Richmond anticipates that over the course of Summer Academy and Afterschool Academy, our scholars will:

· Improve classroom performance: 50% of participating scholars will increase a full letter grade or more or maintain and A/B in math or language arts.
· Improve standardized test performance: 50% of participating scholars will score Advanced or Proficient in math or reading standardized tests.

·  Improve school attendance: 60% of participating scholars will improve their attendance,or maintain zero unexcused absence or tardies.

·  Improve behavior: 75% of participating scholars will interact respectfully with peers.

· Improve attitudes: 75% of scholars will feel confident in their academic abilities.

Long Term Success
Four-year Outcomes:Upon completion of the four-year program, it is our goal for Richmond scholars to replicate similar results as those realized by our DC-Metro scholars:
- The majority of scholars will finish the 8th grade with a B average, or having maintained an A.
- 95% of scholars will advance to a top academic high school with a college track program.
- 93% of alumni will advance to college.
 

Broader Community Impact: Higher Achievement creates lasting change, putting individual students on a path to success,breaking the cycle of poverty for families,and strengthening the social fabric of communities:

· Scholars go on to high school,college,and careers – becoming engaged citizens,active leaders,and change agents in their school and communities.

· Families are given the knowledge and tools to advocate for their children – making their voices heard in their schools,challenging the status quo in their communities,and changing the education landscape for all children.

· Mentors build awareness about education and middle school youth and mobilize networks of people – from corporations to individuals – who otherwise would not be involved in education issues.

·  Schools are impacted by scholar success in the classroom – Higher Achievement scholars “raise the bar” for academics,behavior,and social skills among their peers.

· Communities embrace a dramatic shift – a culture where high achievement is the norm and anything less is unacceptable.

Description High School Transition Services: Beginning  in the 7th grade, Higher Achievement will begin preparing scholars for high school through workshops, where scholars will develop their research and note taking skills, discuss the social and academic expectations they will face and participate in volunteer opportunities to understand the importance of giving back to their community. Higher Achievement will help scholars and families identify and pursue accelerated high school programs that fit their skills and interests, and will keep them on track for college readiness. Options may include the city’s magnet schools or AP/Honors programs in their neighborhood school. For magnet school applications or if a family wishes to pursue private school, Higher Achievement will help them prepare for placement tests, practice interview skills, complete applications, and identify resources for financial assistance when needed.
Fiscal Year
Projected Revenue $1,865,936.00
Projected Expenses $1,833,231.00
Spending Policy N/A
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
----$5,030,136
Government Contributions$3,284,953$2,502,376$1,155,422
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$3,284,953$2,502,376$1,155,422
Individual Contributions$7,589,531$6,384,055$431,034
------
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses($3,057)$45,847$94,853
Membership Dues------
Special Events$133,215----
Revenue In-Kind$227,600$142,836$568,348
Other($859,135)----
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$6,563,929$5,865,202$4,403,099
Administration Expense$1,908,266$1,368,418$1,206,406
Fundraising Expense$864,593$646,032$438,235
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.111.151.20
Program Expense/Total Expenses70%74%73%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue8%7%7%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$9,254,723$8,198,373$6,904,164
Current Assets$5,363,874$4,328,838$3,943,112
Long-Term Liabilities$703,780$731,235$753,610
Current Liabilities$1,253,079$1,205,643$1,084,521
Total Net Assets$7,297,864$6,261,495$5,066,033
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities4.283.593.64
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets8%9%11%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
State Charitable Solicitaions Permit
Solicitations Permit
Solicitations Permit 1/2015View
Comments
Organization Comments
Higher Achievement Richmond is part of a National 501(C)3 under Higher Achievement Program Inc. with additional affiliates in Washington DC, Baltimore, and Pittsburgh. The organization as a whole conducts one audit and files one 990. However, budgets and revenues are conducted on an affiliate-level basis, which each affiliate fundraising to cover their specific expenses. A Richmond-specific proforma is available by request.
Foundation Comments
  • Financial information provided from audited financial statements.
  • Audited financial statements and IRS 990s prepared by LarsonAllen, LLP.
  • Financial information is for the national office and its affiliates.