Youth Life Foundation of Richmond
P.O. Box 15202
Richmond VA 23227
Mission Statement The Youth Life Foundation of Richmond operates Learning Centers to develop leaders by making long-term investments in children from at-risk communities. Our vision is to nurture the child, strengthen family, and rebuild the community! We hope to replicate our Learning Center model in many Richmond communities 
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Heather Goodlett
Board Chair Mrs. Taylor Bates
Board Chair Company Affiliation Bates Orthodontics
Contact Information
Address P.O. Box 15202
Richmond, VA 23227
Telephone 804 228-1620
Fax 804 000-0000
E-mail hgoodlett@ylfr.org
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 2002
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $527,903.00
Projected Expenses $527,605.00
Statements
Mission The Youth Life Foundation of Richmond operates Learning Centers to develop leaders by making long-term investments in children from at-risk communities. Our vision is to nurture the child, strengthen family, and rebuild the community! We hope to replicate our Learning Center model in many Richmond communities 
Impact

2015 - 2016 YLFR Accomplishments:

  • YLFR split LC Remix into Middle School and High School by adding an additional staff member in 2015 which better meets the needs of our older students.
  • YLFR met with the Wheless Family Foundation in fall 2015 and worked out a 5 year growth plan, a strategic map of our organization, and a list of measurable goals!
  • YLFR hired an additional middle school teacher in January 2016 which allowed Katharine Hunt to move out into an administrative role as operations director.
  • YLFR increased our monthly partnership from $14,325 to $15,250 by December 31, 2015.
  • YLFR added 2 new board members by March 2016.

2017 Goals

  • YLFR's financial goal is to increase our monthly partnership from $15,250 to $17,725 by December 2016.
  • YLFR's board goal is to consistently have 12 board members.
  • YLFR would like its ED to increase her hours from 10-20.
  • YLFR would like to have its first Week of Giving in September 2016 and raise $20,000 to buy a new vehicle.
Needs
2017 Needs:
  • Quality, committed volunteers to serve as mentors for our students.
  • Two new board members
  • More monthly partners
  • Corporate partners
  • 2 vehicles to transport our students. 

 

Background  The Youth Life Foundation of Richmond (YLFR) was founded in August 2002 to help children living in at-risk Richmond communities excel academically and succeed in becoming future leaders. As a reading specialist at Glen Lea Elementary School, YLFR Founder Heather Goodlett desired to reach the children with a more focused and long-term commitment in their communities, as well as to build mentoring relationships between the children and caring adults who could serve as positive role models. She was introduced to the Darrell Green Youth Life Foundation (DGYLF) in Washington, D.C., a proven education and leadership development program started by former Washington Redskins football player, Darrell Green. In May 2003, YLFR became an affiliate of DGYLF and began utilizing their after school learning center model in Delmont Plaza, a low-income government-subsidized housing community in Henrico. In 2008, YLFR opened a second after school learning center in Highland Park, a disadvantaged community within Richmond City. In 2013 LC Remix was formed to meet the needs of our middle and high school students. In fall 2014 a third elementary school program began serving the children at JEB Stuart Elementary School. In fall 2015 our LC Remix program broke into 2 sections for middle and high school students to better meet the needs of our older students. 
CEO Statement
"Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him and he will make straight your paths." Proverbs 3:5-6
 
At YLFR we have to trust the Lord for many things: our students, our finances, and our partnerships. Many times I don't understand why something has happened, where the money will come from for the needs that we see, or whom we are supposed to be in relationship with to see this mission fulfilled. But I do trust that God sees and knows all these things.
 
My heart hurts often as I hear about challenging circumstances our families are going through. I get scared and am tempted to worry about the safety of our students when things such as a rash of gun fire and murders occur around our communities. I personally hurt as students that I am close to suddenly shut me out and stop communicating and meeting with me.
 
All of these things show me the reality that I cannot fix people or circumstances, and I have to rely on the Lord daily. This is humbling and difficult yet freeing, all at the same time. I need to be faithful to God's calling to engage in caring for my neighbors and community, and I need to depend on God for the results. 
 
 
Areas of Service
Areas Served
Area
Richmond, City
Henrico County
North Highland Park
Eastern Henrico - Delmont Plaza
Ginter Park  
 
Board Chair
Board Chair Mrs. Taylor Bates
Company Affiliation Bates Orthodontics
Term Nov 2015 to Jan 2018
Email taylorjanebates@gmail.com
Board CoChair
Board CoChair Mr. George Wigginton
Company Affiliation Merck
Term Nov 2015 to Jan 2018
Email Wigginton@comcast.com
Board of Directors
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mrs. Edith Allin VCU
Mrs. Taylor Bates Country Club of Virginia
Mrs. Heather Goodlett Youth Life Foundation of Richmond
Ms. Johanna Kurtz Myers & Stauffer LC
Mr. Matthew Lorish Northside Church of Richmond
Mrs. Leigh Peterson Community Volunteer
Mr. Jon Regrut Afton Chemical Corporation
Mr. Donald Richard LiveNinja
Mrs. Elizabeth Siebers University of Richmond
Mr. George Wigginton Merck
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 6
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 90
Written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Standing Committees
Finance
Executive
Marketing
Program / Program Planning
Board Governance
N/A
Other Boards
The tables below contain information about other groups that advise this nonprofit on operations and projects.
Comments
We would like to have 12 members on the board consistently and are down 2! It is hard to find committed folks for the board, especially men!
Executive Director
Executive Director Mrs. Heather Goodlett
Experience

Heather Brown Goodlett, Founder and Executive Director of Youth Life Foundation of Richmond, graduated from the University of Richmond in 1994 with a B.A. in Speech and Communications and an elementary teacher’s certificate in Early Childhood Education. She taught third grade for four years at Victory Christian Academy in Richmond, Virginia and later earned a Masters of Education in Reading from Virginia Commonwealth University in May of 2000. Mrs. Goodlett was employed with Henrico County schools and began teaching at Glen Lea Elementary School in the fall of 2000 where she was a Title One-Reading teacher.

In 2000, Mrs. Goodlett became aware of the Darrell Green Youth Life Foundation (DGYLF) and Learning Centers begun in Washington, D.C. She soon began the process of fact-finding, researching, and relationship building, and in late 2001 attended a National Training Institute for DGYLF to begin launching an affiliate program in Richmond, Virginia. By September 2002, the quest to establish the organization soon became a full-time position. She resigned from her position with Henrico County Public Schools and began the search for a building in the neighborhoods around Glen Lea Elementary School. The Youth Life Learning Center of Richmond officially began in Delmont Plaza Apartments, a subsidized housing community, in July 2003. A second site was added in Highland Park in fall of 2008. Mrs. Goodlett’s continued vision is to see this successful model replicated in other at-risk neighborhoods in Richmond.

Former CEOs
NameTerm
Ms. Stephanie Gossett Aug 2009 - Apr 2011
Mrs. Sherri Roccaforte Jan 2008 - Aug 2009
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Ms. Amber Hartman Program Director Delmont LC
Ms. Katharine Hunt Operations Director
Mrs. Leahna Sullivan Program Director Highland Park and NorthminstierLC
Mr. Avery Torres Director of High School Programs
Ms. Corinne Tucker Director of Middle School Programs
Staff
Full Time Staff 5
Part Time Staff 6
Volunteers 300
Retention Rate 67
Plans
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted July 2014
Management Succession Plan? No
Organization Policy and Procedures Under Development
Nondiscrimination Policy Under Development
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Collaborations
Northminster Church
Christian Youth Theatre
The Northside Outreach Center
Overby Sheppard Elementaty School
Glen Lea Elementary School
University of Richmond Build It Program
University of Richmond Bonner Scholor Program
University of Richmond Center for Civic Engagement
Central Virignia Foodbank
Playing with a Purpose
 
 
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Central Virginia Foodbank Partner Agency2010
HandsOn Greater Richmond2010
United Way of Greater Richmond & Petersburg Partnership Agency2010
Virginia Mentoring Partnership2008
Awards
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Model Hunger Relief PartnerCentral Virginia Foodbank2007
Programs
Description Operates after-school mentoring and summer enrichment programs for elementary students. Focus is on academic, character and leadership development. Delmont Learning Center has been serving the community of Delmont Plaza Apartments for 13 years.
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Budget $82,350.00
Short Term Success

Our desire is to equip children with the skills to succeed, encourage them in their dreams, support them during their critical growing-up years, and see them make a difference as leaders in their communities. To this end, we focus on setting and achieving individualized academic and character-building goals for our students each school year and during our summer program aimed at helping them overcome obstacles to their success at school, at home, and in their community. Specifically:

  1. Because reading ability impacts performance in every academic subject, we hope to take on under-achieving or emerging readers and see improvement by at least 1.5 grade levels for 80% of the students each year they are with us.
  2. In working with our current students, we have found that developing good writing skills is one of the biggest challenges for children. We want to see at least a 1.5 grade level improvement in written expression for 75% of the students each year.
Long Term Success
Long-term indicators include the children advancing as expected academically and even above expectations year after year, a growing commitment among the children to achieve more in school and improve their behavior, and the children thinking and speaking positively and constructively about their future careers and family lives.

Our long-term goal is to develop children who are able to become not only responsible citizens, but also leaders in their community making positive contributions. By taking the time to nurture their academic abilities and encourage their character development, we are equipping them for great success beyond secondary school. By investing in their families, we are cultivating strong support systems that benefit the child and the adult.

Description Operates after-school mentoring and summer enrichment programs for elementary students. Focus is on academic, character and leadership development. Highland Park Learning Center has been serving the community for 8 years.
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Budget $53,047.00
Short Term Success

Our desire is to equip children with the skills to succeed, encourage them in their dreams, support them during their critical growing-up years, and see them make a difference as leaders in their communities. To this end, we focus on setting and achieving individualized academic and character-building goals for our students each school year and during our summer program aimed at helping them overcome obstacles to their success at school, at home, and in their community. Specifically:

  1. Because reading ability impacts performance in every academic subject, we hope to take on under-achieving or emerging readers and see improvement by at least 1.5 grade levels for 80% of the students each year they are with us.
  2. In working with our current students, we have found that developing good writing skills is one of the biggest challenges for children. We want to see at least a 1.5 grade level improvement in written expression for 75% of the students each year.
Long Term Success

Long-term indicators include the children advancing as expected academically and even above expectations year after year, a growing commitment among the children to achieve more in school and improve their behavior, and the children thinking and speaking positively and constructively about their future careers and family lives.

 

Our long-term goal is to develop children who are able to become not only responsible citizens, but also leaders in their community making positive contributions. By taking the time to nurture their academic abilities and encourage their character development, we are equipping them for great success beyond secondary school. By investing in their families, we are cultivating strong support systems that benefit the child and the adult.

Description
Both elementary programs feed into this new full-time program focused on the changing needs of our older students.  Middle and high school students participate in leadership and character development, giving back to the community, and academic tutoring while building positive relationships with peers and adults. In fall of 2015 we were able to separate our middle school students from our high school students to better serve both groups!
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Budget $64,987.00
Short Term Success

By continuing and expanding the proven and effective elementary programs in Highland Park and Delmont, an ongoing increase in academic progress is expected. Measured by the results of the WIAT II testing, there should be at least a 1.5 grade level increase in reading and math scores for 75% of the students each year. Retaining involvement during the critical middle and high school years is a vital step in fulfilling the commitment to long-term investment. Attendance and participation in all activities will be tracked as the main way to measure progress towards this goal. By attending 85% of all activities from September through June (such as programming, service projects and events), each student can earn a reward trip at the end of each year. At least 80% of middle and high school students will earn this reward. 

Long Term Success

Long-term indicators include the children advancing as expected academically and even above expectations year after year, a growing commitment among the children to achieve more in school and improve their behavior, and the children thinking and speaking positively and constructively about their future careers and family lives.

 

Our long-term goal is to develop children who are able to become not only responsible citizens, but also leaders in their community making positive contributions. By taking the time to nurture their academic abilities and encourage their character development, we are equipping them for great success beyond secondary school. By investing in their families, we are cultivating strong support systems that benefit the child and the adult.

Description This is our third elementary learning center serving students from JEB Stuart Elementary School and Ginter Park Elementary school. It is an after school and summer program.
Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Budget $42,222.00
Short Term Success See above - includes both
Long Term Success Measures of Success: Academic: • % of kids who graduate elementary program who get high school diploma • % of high school kids who get diploma • % of reading at year level or gaining ground to read closer to year level at end of academic year • % of students who’s academic skills are at grade level, or are getting closer to performing at grade level at end of year • % of students who make the honor roll Family/Community: • % of kids who graduate high school without children • % of kids who graduate without legal issues • % of kids who finish high school program and go continue education or transition to full time meaningful employment • % of students who are awarded citizen or attendance awards at school • Length of time students are involved with YLFR i.e. 77% of current Middle and High School students started attending a LC before 3rd grade • Number and length of mentor matches Spiritual: • % of Elementary students who can answer basic Biblical questions (Who is Jesus, who is Moses, etc) • % of Middle school students who respond “positively” to being “spiritually open to Jesus as Lord and Savior” • % of High School who self-identify as Christians and have acceptance Jesus Physical/Emotional: • % of elementary students eligible for mystery trip Difference in average behavior points for elementary students in October vs. March (or April) • % of student eligible for Fun Fridays beginning of year and end of year • Mentor assessment of “emotional engagement” YLFR Operational: • $/student (all grade levels) • % Retention from elementary to middle school • % Retention from Middle to High School
CEO/ED/Board Comments
 
 
Fiscal Year
Projected Revenue $527,903.00
Projected Expenses $527,605.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Form 990s
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$83,893--$49,644
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$100,799$267,182$143,228
$570----
$470$470--
Investment Income, Net of Losses$58$58--
Membership Dues------
Special Events$63,131($13,967)$55,386
Revenue In-Kind$66,257$24,900$32,964
Other$129--$838
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$278,284$250,331$229,178
Administration Expense$36,078$25,033$17,521
Fundraising Expense$16,704$12,315$13,227
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.950.971.09
Program Expense/Total Expenses84%87%88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue7%5%5%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$153,242$169,096$169,419
Current Assets$132,933$141,580$162,763
Long-Term Liabilities$0----
Current Liabilities$18,877$18,972$10,259
Total Net Assets$134,365$150,124$159,160
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities7.047.4615.87
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitaions Permit
Solicitations Permit
Solicitations Permit ExemptionView
Comments
Foundation Comments
  • Financial information provided from audit.  
  • Audit prepared by James R. O'Brien, CPA