Richmond Hill
2209 East Grace Street
Richmond VA 23223-7066
Mission Statement
   The mission of Richmond Hill is to advance the healing of metropolitan Richmond through hospitality, healing, prayer, racial reconciliation, and spiritual development.  
   Richmond Hill is an ecumenical Christian community and covenant fellowship which maintains a retreat center and place of prayer in the historic Monte Maria monastery on Church Hill in the center of metropolitan Richmond. A residential community of 12-15 persons keeps a daily rhythm of prayer and a common life, based on a common Rule of Life. 
   Richmond Hill's Community and covenant fellowship keep the monastery and its grounds in trust for the citizens of metropolitan Richmond. The gardens, chapel, and library are open to the public every day of the week except Monday before 4 p.m. Retreats and spiritual direction are available for individuals and groups of up to 40 persons. Our covenant fellowship is simply an open-ended group of persons from throughout greater Richmond who covenant to pray for the healing of the metropolitan city.  
   The Richmond Hill Community exists to provide a long-term and prayerful base for communication and mutual ministry among churches and individuals in metropolitan Richmond, crossing racial, economic, jurisdictional and denominational lines.  Prayer services and retreats are offered daily throughout the year, and groups who are holding their own retreats join together in prayer for the city before meals.  
   The Richmond Hill Community and fellowship work to support and develop relationships between churches and other groups, businesses, and governmental entities seeking to make metropolitan Richmond a healthy and just community. The relationships formed at Richmond Hill result in a number of projects in community and social ministry, including particularly ministry in public schools.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director The Rev. Janie M. Walker
Board Chair Mr. Don Cowles
Board Chair Company Affiliation Retired VP, Reynolds Metals Corp.
Contact Information
Address 2209 East Grace Street
Richmond, VA 232237066
Telephone 804 783-7903
Fax 804 783-7957
E-mail administrator@richmondhillva.org
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1986
Financial Summary
Revenue vs Expense Bar Graph - All Years
Expense Breakdown Bar Chart - All Years
 
 
Projected Revenue $887,792.00
Projected Expenses $887,792.00
Statements
Mission
   The mission of Richmond Hill is to advance the healing of metropolitan Richmond through hospitality, healing, prayer, racial reconciliation, and spiritual development.  
   Richmond Hill is an ecumenical Christian community and covenant fellowship which maintains a retreat center and place of prayer in the historic Monte Maria monastery on Church Hill in the center of metropolitan Richmond. A residential community of 12-15 persons keeps a daily rhythm of prayer and a common life, based on a common Rule of Life. 
   Richmond Hill's Community and covenant fellowship keep the monastery and its grounds in trust for the citizens of metropolitan Richmond. The gardens, chapel, and library are open to the public every day of the week except Monday before 4 p.m. Retreats and spiritual direction are available for individuals and groups of up to 40 persons. Our covenant fellowship is simply an open-ended group of persons from throughout greater Richmond who covenant to pray for the healing of the metropolitan city.  
   The Richmond Hill Community exists to provide a long-term and prayerful base for communication and mutual ministry among churches and individuals in metropolitan Richmond, crossing racial, economic, jurisdictional and denominational lines.  Prayer services and retreats are offered daily throughout the year, and groups who are holding their own retreats join together in prayer for the city before meals.  
   The Richmond Hill Community and fellowship work to support and develop relationships between churches and other groups, businesses, and governmental entities seeking to make metropolitan Richmond a healthy and just community. The relationships formed at Richmond Hill result in a number of projects in community and social ministry, including particularly ministry in public schools.
Impact
Accomplishments:
 
 1. Richmond Hill's Armstrong Leadership Program celebrates its 10th Anniversary -  In 2004 Richmond Hill began a partnership with Armstrong High School to create the Armstrong Leadership Program for 36-52 students selected each school year from grades 9-12.  The program focuses on helping students achieve leadership excellence in their academic and professional endeavors through personal development, leadership training, mentoring, post-graduate preparation and services projects.

2. RVA Rapid Transit
 - Richmond Hill's RVA Rapid Transit is a community organization launched in 2013, composed of citizens of Metro Richmond dedicated to bringing efficient, modern mass transit to the greater Richmond region. In September, GRTC received a $24.9 Million federal grant to fund the Broad Street BRT project.  
 
3.  The Micah Initiative began its 11th year - The Micah Initiative is a partnership between faith communities and Richmond Public Schools that encourages mentoring, tutoring, and volunteering at the elementary school level through its vibrant network of more than 130 faith communities and 23 schools, so that every child believes, “I’m valuable.”
 
Goals:
 
1. Convene first Metro Richmond Clergy Convocation in November. Co-sponsored by Virginia Union School of Theology; will inform metro Richmond clergy about needs of metropolitan city’s people, efforts to address them.  Clergy will gather across denominational, racial, and jurisdictional lines.

2. Establish Armstrong High School Leadership Program.
  Sponsored by Richmond Hill the past four years, now moving more deeply into relationship with school. Leadership will be shared by new A-K Pride alumni association, which Richmond Hill has helped to form.
 
3. Establish new monthly Weekend program of reflective, contemplative retreats for the public and covenant fellowship of Richmond Hill.

4. Strengthen spiritual guidance program by
calling full-time residential spiritual director; meeting increasing demand for spiritual guidance from metro Richmond individuals; strengthening peer groups for 50 adjunct spiritual directors; and training 16 new spiritual directors in RUAH School of Spiritual Guidance.
 
5. Teach Richmond history by offering and publishing lectures on Richmond’s Unhealed History; developing Slave Trail programs; and supporting development of National Slavery Museum in Shockoe Bottom.
Needs

1. Effective recruitment for residential Community membership and staff positions, including currently hospitality, music, and associate pastor.

2. Armstrong Leadership Program: This program supports 32 rising leaders at Armstrong High School, and has also served to bring an increasing number of volunteers, graduates of the high school, and resources into metro Richmond’s most highly impacted school. Leadership of the program is passing to community groups, and seed grants have ended, and its effectiveness has steadily grown, but the 2011-2012 year is seriously in need of funding. NEEDED: $75,000 for 2011-2012 fiscal year.

3. Media/public relations: A full-time residential person with skills is needed. Senior resident is $25,000; intern is $15,000. $10,000 in production costs needed as well. Total $35,000.

4. Clergy/church development program: Richmond Hill is a de facto association of clergy and churches, crossing denominational, racial, and jurisdictional lines, in a situation in which there are no effective continuing organizations. The full development of this program with a senior and experienced clergy staff person and media for communications will cost $100,000 a year for three years. It can begin with $35,000 in the first year.

5. Covenant fellowship: Richmond Hill is in the process of building its pledge base and covenant fellowship through development and membership efforts. A new database will be brought on line in the Fall of 2010. The goal for the year is to double the number of annual fund pledges from Richmond Hill’s regular supporters.

Background

            Richmond Hill was established in 1985 in an unprecedented collaboration of 15 different Christian denominations, working together to purchase the historic Monte Maria Monastery in Church Hill, in the center of Richmond, and keep it as a place of prayer.

            Richmond Hill opened for retreats in November of 1989. The residential community now consists of 12 persons, male and female, married and single, from seven different Christian denominations. Senior members commit to 3-5 years of residency, and interns to one year. The Community maintains a life of prayer, praying together three times every day for the metropolitan city of Richmond, for justice, and for the healing of the metropolitan community. The Community’s Rule of Life expresses the principles of its founding, including prayer, racial reconciliation, ecumenism, and Christian social transformation. A covenant fellowship helps to support the ministry. Residents receive small stipends and live sacrificially.

            The Community prays for the city, and keeps in trust a place of prayer for the people of the metropolitan city. All prayer services are open to the public. The garden, labyrinth, chapel, and monastery are open all week except for Mondays before 4 pm. Individual spiritual guidance and healing prayer are offered.

            Many groups retreat at Richmond Hill, where there are 40 beds for overnight retreats and 60 places for weekday events.

            Richmond Hill sponsors schools of Spiritual Guidance, Healing Prayer, Pastoral Counseling, and Urban Mission. Retreats are sponsored by the Community at least one weekend each month, and individuals may retreat at any time. 

            The Community supports and develops common ministries with churches and clergy in metropolitan Richmond. It staffs the Micah Association, linking more than 100 faith communities to Richmond public elementary schools, and the Armstrong Leadership Program, which engages 32 Armstrong students a year in their own future and the health of their school. Richmond Hill sponsors Metro Richmond at Prayer, a common weekly prayer calendar involving more than 400 of metro Richmond’s 1400+ churches. Summer Camp on the Hill joins teams from suburban and inner city churches in an inter-racial and inter-jurisdictional ministry to children in Richmond’s public housing neighborhoods. 

            Richmond Hill overlooks the city and the river from its highest hill, and includes the Adams-Taylor House, built in 1811. A wall encloses the monastery, courtyard, and gardens.

CEO Statement

            It is almost impossible to explain to people the importance of a consistent, enduring, constant place of prayer and reflection for the metropolitan city. But Richmond has had such a place since the Sisters of the Visitation of Monte Maria came to Richmond Hill in 1866, right after the War. The city was traumatized. Black people were traumatized – free, but dealing with the horror of what had been the largest slave market on the East Coast of America for more than a generation. And white people were traumatized from the carnage of the Civil War. The city had been burned. 

            The sisters came, started a school, and began to pray for the city. Today that prayer continues in an ecumenical Christian community of men and women. With the prayer commitment, comes relationships, racial relations, conversations and organizations addressing metro Richmond’s tremendous unmet needs. 

            Segregation in metro Richmond has been replaced not by integration but by disintegration. Since the integration of the schools, the population has doubled but the area of sprawl has increased 500%.

            Nonetheless, it is a great community which holds within it not only the central stream of the history of the nation, but also some of the hopes for the nation’s future. 

            Each of us needs to take quiet time with the God of our understanding to be the people God needs us to be; and then, in constructive and ad hoc fellowship with others, we can help rebuild the city which God and our ancestors hoped and prayed would be here. 

            It’s hard to explain how keeping this community of prayer here in this monastery gives concrete results and makes sense; but it is clear that it does. It is a capital investment in the spiritual and moral life of our metropolitan city, and ultimately in its physical and social success as well.

              The Rev. Ben Campbell, Pastoral Director 
Board Chair Statement
There is nothing more important than "healing" metropolitan Richmond.  The process begins by having conversations on issues which divide the community:  Racism, poverty, public education, public housing and a host of other issues.  Relationship building is at the heart of the healing process.  Richmond Hill facilitates this work through prayer, hospitality, racial reconciliation and spiritual growth.  While Richmond Hill is an ecumenical Christian community, the work it does cuts across interfaith lines and promotes an inclusive sense of community for people who are marginalized (it is not an evangelism/proselytizing ministry).  While it is hard to measure the success of "spirit" work, I believe our city would be in much worse shape without the prayerful attention of the Richmond Hill Community.  The concern for the inner life of each individual translates into important social programs:  The Micah Initiative and the Armstrong Leadership Program to name two in the education area.  For the last four years, Richmond Hill has been my spiritual home.  At present it is my privilege to serve as chair of the Richmond Hill Council. 
   
The Rev. Robert G. Hetherington, Council Chair
Areas of Service
Areas Served
Area
Metro Richmond
   We specifically serve the city of metropolitan Richmond, which is best defined from the air.  It includes the four major jurisdictions of Richmond, Hanover, Henrico, and Chesterfield; five exurban counties -- Powhatan, Goochland, Charles City, New Kent, and Amelia; and the town of Ashland.  The Petersburg metropolitan area, including Hopewell, Colonial Heights, Prince George, and Dinwiddie, is sometimes involved.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Don Cowles
Company Affiliation Retired VP, Reynolds Metals Corp.
Term June 2015 to June 2018
Email DTCowles@aol.com
Board CoChair
Board CoChair The Rev. Phoebe Roaf
Company Affiliation Rector, St. Philip's Episcopal Church
Term June 2015 to June 2017
Email motherroaf@comcast.net
Board of Directors
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Dominic Barrett Executive Director, Shalom Farms
The Rev. Dr. Lynne B. Caldwell Pastor, Brookland United Methodist Church
Ms. DeBorah J. Cannady Retreat Coordinator, Richmond Hill, Inc.
Mr. Donald "Don" T. Cowles Retired Vice President, Reynolds Metals Corp.
Ms. Theresa "Terry" Dolson University of Richmond
Ms. Brenda A. Giannini Educator & Spiritual Guide, Higher Achievement, Henrico Co. & Colonial Heights Public Schools
Mr. Timothy "Tim" P. Holtz Executive Director, Richmond Christian Leadership Institute
Mrs. Latrice C. Jeffrey LPN, Retreat Hospital
Rev. Marcus D. Martin Pastor, New Bridge Baptist Church
Mrs. Cynthia "Cindy" S. Paris Editor, Op-Ed Page, Richmond Times Dispatch
Ms. Rita C. Ricks Inspirational Speaker and Life Coach, Mirror Enterprise, Inc.
The Rev. Phoebe A. Roaf Rector, St. Philip's Episcopal Church
Mr. Richard E. Rumble Jr.Communications Director, Richmond Hill, Inc.
Mrs. Donna Thompson Director of External Relations, Common Good
Mr. David B. Vinson Administrator, Richmond Hill, Inc.
Mrs. Audrey Vosburg Owner, It Is Well, LLC
The Rev. Janie M. Walker Co-Pastor, Richmond Hill, Inc.
Mr. Charles Williams Food Service Director, Boaz & Ruth
The Rev. Tiont Williams Urban Area Director, Richmond City Young Life
Mr. N. Davis Wrinkle Retired, Alumni Director, St. Christopher's School
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 9
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 10
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 8
Female 11
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 82
Written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 10
Standing Committees
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Executive
Finance
Human Resources / Personnel
Building
Nominating
Program / Program Planning
Other Boards
The tables below contain information about other groups that advise this nonprofit on operations and projects.
Executive Director
Executive Director The Rev. Janie M. Walker
Experience

Janie is a native of Sandston, Va.  She studied mathematics at Virginia State University for a year before beginning work as an Accounts Payable Supervisor at Phillip Morris, USA.  She then began working as a clergy person in several roles, while continuing her education at Virginia Commonwealth University, Central Virginia School of Ministry where she earned an Associate’s Degree in Biblical Studies and the Samuel DeWitt Proctor School of Theology at Virginia Union University where she earned a Masters of Divinity with a concentration in Theology.

Co-CEO
Co-CEO Rev. Joel T. Blunk
Term Start Apr 2016
Email jblunk@richmondhillva.org
Experience


Former CEOs
NameTerm
The Rev. Benjamin P. Campbell Dec 1986 - June 2015
Staff
Full Time Staff 13
Part Time Staff 6
Volunteers 200
Retention Rate 85
Plans
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Yes
Years Strategic Plan Considers 5
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Jan 2010
Management Succession Plan? Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy No
Document Destruction Policy No
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy No
Programs
Description Richmond Hill is a basic resource for spiritual retreat for individuals and groups, maintained by a Christian residential community of persons who commit to a common rule of life, maintain a rhythm of prayer, and receive very modest stipends. Open to the public six days a week, Monday-Sunday. 40 overnight rooms for groups, five for individual retreatants. Full program of weekend retreats, and schools of spiritual guidance, healing prayer, pastoral care. Individual spiritual guidance and healing prayer available. Library, garden, chapel, novitiate available for prayer, study, and reflection. Prayer daily at 7am, Noon, and 6pm in the Chapel. Eucharist 5:30pm Monday, 7am Wednesday, Taize service 1st Mondays 7:30pm, centering prayer Tuesdays 4:30pm, soaking prayer 4th Mondays 7:30pm, 1st Thursdays 10am. Available for day and overnight retreats by individuals and groups.  
Population Served Adults
Budget $520,000.00
Long Term Success Healing of the metropolitan city, promoting healthier and more clearly vocated adults.  Relationships between persons of different denominations, races, and jurisdictions within the metro Richmond Christian community, and between persons of constructive spiritual intent throughout the metropolitan city.  Increase in common purpose and constructive citizenship, education of spiritual people on social needs and contacts with public officials to find ways of making an effective conribution.
Description

            Richmond Hill staffs and co-sponsors the Micah Initiative, an association of more than 130 faith communities which work with the elementary schools of Richmond. More than 1400 volunteers provide mentoring, tutoring, classroom assistance, and special projects in cooperation with the principal of 23 schools. A single program director helps to arrange, negotiate and encourage the relationships between the faith communities and the schools. Training is provided by the Virginia Mentoring Partnership and Micah collaborates where possible with Communities in Schools (CIS) to provide a site coordinator/volunteer coordinator. Cost of program director is only $65,000 annually. Support is needed for individual site coordinators with CIS. Micah attempts to contribute from $25,000 - $40,000 in a school to match CIS in site coordinator position, which is proven to double or triple the effectiveness of volunteer and community support.

Population Served Children Only (5 - 14 years)
Budget $60,000.00
Short Term Success Improvement of test scores, graduation rates, and post-secondary education and employment for the 90% of the students of Richmond Public Schools who are on free and reduced lunch.
Long Term Success Incorporation of the Richmond Public School System into the community of concern of the entire metropolitan area; proper funding of $800 million backlog in school capital expenditures; availability of special program and funding for the 90% of our children who are in poverty and need special help; removal of discriminatory aid formulas at the state which give more per student to suburban districts; and development of an integrated system of education and opportunity for all the students of metropolitan Richmond.
Description

Richmond Hill sponsors the Armstrong Leadership Program for 36-52 students in grades 9-12 at Armstrong High School, the most heavily stressed high school in metropolitan Richmond. Armstrong serves the children of six public housing projects, with household incomes in the $10,000 - $13,000 range, who are most in danger of social breakdown and leaving school before completion. The program has developed an extensive mentoring network for a larger percentage of the student body. In the past ten years, all of the ALP students have graduated, all have post-secondary placements, and a significant number have attended four-year colleges on scholarships. Travelers’ Insurance is a major partner offering funding for the program and job shadowing opportunities for students.  The program is funded each school year through grants and donations.

Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years)
Budget $145,000.00
Short Term Success Grades and graduation and placement of our graduates, as well as our own experience of each child.
Long Term Success Success of graduates in employment and post-secondary education.  Improvement of positive atmosphere and motivation in Armstrong High School, as shown in increased on-time graduation, post-secondary placement, and number of mentors and tutors working with Armstrong students.  Improvement in relationship of larger community and potential employers to the needs and potentials of students from this most distressed portion of our citizenry.
Description

            Richmond Hill engages suburban and urban congregations in a “summer mission project at home.” One or more suburban or out-of-east-end congregation sends a mission team of ten persons to live at Richmond Hill from Monday-Saturday on each of four weeks during July and August. A Church Hill congregation provides a similar ten-person team in residence. The 20 adults work with a director and assistant director, and four college-age interns, to produce a summer camp for 50 children each week. The students are rising third and fourth graders from the elementary schools of Church Hill, most of whom live in public housing. The camps are held at four different churches in Church Hill. The program focuses both on the care of the children and the interaction and learning of the adults. Cash cost is $65,000 annually, yielding a program worth $200,000.

Budget $0.00
Short Term Success 200 adults and 200 children participate effectively and learn each summer.
Long Term Success Increased longterm relationship between church members of different races,  denominations, and jurisdictions in metropolitan Richmond, and an increasing sense of common ministry and locality.  Increased understanding between races, and understanding of needs, issues, opportunities, and potential of our inner city children.  Understanding of social issues of public housing, jurisdictional segregation, taxation differentials, employment issues facing inner city people.
Description

            Richmond Hill is a de facto association of clergy and churches throughout Metro Richmond. It maintains a common calendar of prayer, “Metro Richmond at Prayer,” in which participating churches pray in concert for the needs of the entire metropolitan community. It sponsors common activities for clergy and churches, and convenes them periodically. It brokers partnership relationships between churches, and between churches and community needs. In the fall of 2010, it is co-sponsoring the Metro Richmond Clergy Convocation with the School of Theology of Virginia Union University, at which public officials will discuss with clergy the most difficult issues they face. An extended network, and specific information on community needs, are under development. Cash to support communications and staff development needed is $85,000.

 

Budget $85,000.00
CEO/ED/Board Comments Richmond Hill has been involved in employment/unemployment issues, in support of public education, in public transportation, in the city poverty commission, and in issues of jails and prisons.  We have worked extensively to help develop the Slave Trail and the Slave Museum, as well as to present community information and accurate history to Richmonders.  The residential community of prayer and hospitality is a constant crucible for relationship and program development in the metropolitan city.
Fiscal Year
Projected Revenue $887,792.00
Projected Expenses $887,792.00
Endowment Value $20,000.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Form 990s
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
--$170,028--
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$799,818$596,224$344,484
------
$236,182$223,527$229,769
Investment Income, Net of Losses$907$73,773$88,599
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind$36,050$21,401$299,838
Other$1,294$2,976$10,617
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$885,914$754,652$692,381
Administration Expense$142,386$107,864$107,178
Fundraising Expense$82,124$86,578$82,247
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.971.151.10
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%80%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue10%11%24%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$5,587,106$5,615,871$5,468,975
Current Assets$120,927$184,321$142,190
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0--
Current Liabilities$46,380$38,972$30,911
Total Net Assets$5,540,726$5,576,899$5,438,064
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities2.614.734.60
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
State Charitable Solicitaions Permit
Solicitations Permit
Solicitations Permit 11/2015View
Comments
Organization Comments We are eager to discuss these in person and on site with anyone interested in or considering funding the ministries of Richmond Hill.