OAR of Richmond
3111 West Clay Street
Richmond VA 23230
Mission Statement
OAR enhances public safety by providing individuals and families affected by incarceration with transition services that support safe and successful reintegration into the community. 
 
The pre- and post-release case management services provided by OAR have as their focus successful long-term community reintegration. Key initiatives are (1) to assist incarcerated adults prepare for their release; (2) to assist released adults in locating and retaining employment; (3) to assist adult offenders with structured and supportive guidance and individual counseling services; and (4) to develop and maintain a community support system for returning citizens through the use of staff, volunteers, and community partnerships.

OAR’s work toward fulfillment of our mission is made possible through the endeavors of dedicated staff and volunteers. Additionally, OAR has always relied on partnerships to assist in responding to a client’s total needs. These strategic alliances permit OAR to leverage our organizational resources in order to provide optimum programs and opportunities that further the organization’s mission. 

 

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Sara Conlon
Board Chair Mr. Thomas F Coates III
Board Chair Company Affiliation Coates and Davenport, P.C.
Contact Information
Address 3111 West Clay Street
Richmond, VA 23230
Telephone 804 643-2746
Fax 804 643-1187
E-mail info@oarric.org
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1974
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $1,092,683.00
Projected Expenses $1,092,683.00
Statements
Mission
OAR enhances public safety by providing individuals and families affected by incarceration with transition services that support safe and successful reintegration into the community. 
 
The pre- and post-release case management services provided by OAR have as their focus successful long-term community reintegration. Key initiatives are (1) to assist incarcerated adults prepare for their release; (2) to assist released adults in locating and retaining employment; (3) to assist adult offenders with structured and supportive guidance and individual counseling services; and (4) to develop and maintain a community support system for returning citizens through the use of staff, volunteers, and community partnerships.

OAR’s work toward fulfillment of our mission is made possible through the endeavors of dedicated staff and volunteers. Additionally, OAR has always relied on partnerships to assist in responding to a client’s total needs. These strategic alliances permit OAR to leverage our organizational resources in order to provide optimum programs and opportunities that further the organization’s mission. 

 

Impact

During fiscal year 2017, the OAR Board and Staff have worked on developing our next 3 year strategic plan as well as updating our mission, vision, and value statements.  The Board will approve the plan and statements at their June 1027 meeting.

 
In 2016, OAR began its new program: Ride to Reentry.  This program matches participants with bikes that provide a more sustainable form of transportation as well as help getting to jobs past the bus line.  This year we were able to partner with Saint Christopher's School for a bike drive which brought 160 bikes to OAR.  Capital One also held a bike build which will bring over 20 new bikes to our program.  Each participant completes a bike safety (rules of the road) class and a maintenance class before receiving a bike, helmet, lights, and lock.
 
OAR is currently participating in the Service Enterprise Initiative through HandsOn RVA.  We hope to become a certified Service Enterprise in 2018. 
 
OAR's goals for this fiscal year include:
-continue to implement evidence based practices and assessments
-continue to increase the number of jobs obtained by clients
-continue to diversify our funding stream
-increase the number of active volunteers 
Needs

OAR, our community’s largest, oldest, and most experienced nonprofit organization that provides transition and reentry services, works hard to meet the needs of pre- and post-release returning citizens in the greater Richmond region.  OAR faced funding cuts for several years between 2006 and 2009 but has been working to diversify funding streams as well as to keep current stable funding. 

Background

OAR was founded in 1971 by volunteers who wanted to provide inmates at the Richmond City Jail a community connection through visitation and support services upon release. Incorporated in 1974, OAR was accepted as a United Way partner the following year. OAR’s downtown Central Office location was established as our first post-release site in 1990; pre- and post-release services are now provided in 5 jails, 4 prisons, and 1 community site throughout the Central Virginia region.

A significant percentage of OAR's clients report a history of substance abuse, homelessness, and unemployment as well as a lack of academic and/or vocational skills.  Many have no family/friends support system and are, therefore, considered to be "more at risk".  In addition to providing needed direct services and teaching them how to access services not directly provided by this organization, OAR strives to become their support system until they develop other social bonds in the community.

In a May 3, 2010, Times-Dispatch article about the experiences of some local business leaders who participated in a simulation exercise to better understand the plight of our area’s homeless citizens, the writer spoke of his visit to OAR’s Central Office: “ . . . we did visit OAR on Third Street, which helps people find a place in the community after they are released from jail.  Its offices, which seem to set the standard for frugal efficiency, were packed”.

 OAR 's major funding sources are the VA Department of Criminal Justice Services, United Way, and the city of Richmond.  In addition to these sources OAR enjoys the support of several area churches, local foundations, and individuals.

 Throughout its 41-year history, OAR has sought to bring together organizations and public agencies to work within an integrated system for a more cost effective, efficient way to provide community managed services.  Since 2006, OAR has been a co-convener of the Richmond Regional Reentry Council and the Richmond Regional Reentry Program, a result of the Governor's Reentry Initiative.  Much of OAR's increase in services and resources over the years has been due to successful collaborations and participation in the network of local community service providers.

 

CEO Statement It is an honor to serve alongside the OAR Board and staff as we seek to assist returning citizens with their journey to success.  I'm extremely pleased with the person-centered, strengths-based atmosphere that exists for our participants.  OAR serves 4,200 participants per year and we are making a difference in the lives of our clients and the community.
Board Chair Statement


Areas of Service
Areas Served
Area
Richmond, City
Ashland
Chester
Chesterfield County
Colonial Heights, City
Dinwiddie County
Ettrick
Goochland County
Hanover County
Henrico County
Hopewell, City
Matoaka
Petersburg, City
Powhatan County
Prince George County
Charles City County
New Kent County
Other

OAR’s target population is any person who has an adult criminal conviction and is either currently incarcerated at one of OAR’s jail or prison service locations or residing in the greater Richmond region.  

Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Thomas F Coates III
Company Affiliation Coates and Davenport, P.C.
Term July 2015 to June 2018
Email info@oarric.org
Board of Directors
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Ericka Battle Coates and Davenport
Milton Brown Jr.Retired Lawyer
Mrs. Katie Campbell Consultant
Ms. Cecelia Christian-Garner City of Richmond Justice Services
Mr. Thomas F. Coates IIICoates & Davenport
Ms. Ernestine Gilpin Retired, U. S. Government Attorney
Dr. Peter Henry Virginia Commonwealth University
Mr. Brice Lambert Attorney
Mr. Ethan Lindbloom Janney
Ms. Brenda Lowry Lowry Consulting Services, LLC
Mr. Charlie Munford Davenport
Ms. Diane Orben Former Client
Dr. Kristin Reed Virginia Commonwealth University
Ms. Ty Richardson District 1 Probation and Parole
Mr. Doyle Tunnell Former Client
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 6
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 95
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 100
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Standing Committees
Executive
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Board Governance
Other Boards
The tables below contain information about other groups that advise this nonprofit on operations and projects.
Executive Director
Executive Director Ms. Sara Conlon
Staff
Full Time Staff 11
Part Time Staff 4
Volunteers 240
Contractors 1
Retention Rate 100
Plans
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted June 2017
Management Succession Plan? Yes
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Programs
Description
Case management services are provided to residents in 5 local jails:  Richmond, Chesterfield, Henrico, Henrico Regional, and Pamunkey Regional, and in the state prisons that participate as partners in the Richmond Regional Reentry Program:  Fluvanna, Deep Meadow, and Virginia Correctional Center for Women.  Case managers prioritize service need by release date, determine individual service needs through an intake process, and develop a service delivery plan focusing on the client’s release.
 
Substance abuse and life skills groups, tutoring, housing placement assistance, and in-jail and community resource referrals are provided. 
Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Short Term Success
There are a number of different outcomes that OAR looks at to determines success.  Each client who becomes employed even if they have been searching for employment for a year or more is viewed as a success.  Employed clients receive incentives for maintaining consistent employment in increments of 30 and 90 days, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years.  OAR's job retention has been the highest it has ever been during the last 2 years; clients are now maintaining employment for the different increments as long as or longer than the general public.  We consider these results to be an indication of our providing long-term support to our clients and trying to address chronic issues such as homelessness or substance abuse prior to their getting employment. 
Long Term Success Ultimate long-term successes would be a reduction in the number of people re-incarcerated and the costs of arrests/incarceration and an increase in public safety. OAR does not have access to criminal records and, therefore, we are not able to determine our recidivism (reconviction) rate. We have been told by our state funder that they will assist us in the near future to obtain the information we need to determine our annual recidivism rate. We are looking forward to being able to have that information since it would not only be helpful in showing the positive effect of our programs, but would also give us a better picture with which to analyze what we do, what works, and what we need to revisit.
Description

Case management ervices are provided at OAR’s Central Office in downtown Richmond.  Most clients are walk-ins. A case manager meets individually with each client for an intake and develops a list of service needs focusing on successful community reintegration.   

OAR provides a weekly job readiness class that addresses job search techniques, interviewing skills, employer follow-up, coping on the job, etc. Other services include assistance with obtaining identification documents, a weekly jobs list, transportation for job search/interviews, resumes/applications, and work clothing/tools as needed once employment is gained. OAR also provides basic necessities (prescriptions, seasonal clothing, hygiene kits), housing assistance, life skills and individual/group substance abuse services, and referrals for services not directly provided by OAR.

Population Served Offenders/Ex-Offenders
Short Term Success

There are a number of different outcomes that OAR looks at to determine success.  Each client who becomes employed even if they have been searching for employment for a year or more is viewed as a success.  Employed clients receive incentives for maintaining consistent employment in increments of 30 and 90 days, 6 months, and 1, 2, and 3 years.  OAR's job retention has been the highest it has ever been during the last 2 years; clients are now maintaining employment for the different increments as long as or longer than the general public.  We consider these results to be an indication of our providing long-term support to our clients and trying to address chronic issues such as homelessness or substance abuse prior to their getting employment. 

Long Term Success

Ultimate long-term successes would be a reduction in the number of people re-incarcerated and the costs of arrests/incarceration and an increase in public safety. OAR does not have access to criminal records and, therefore, we are not able to determine our recidivism (reconviction) rate. We have been told by our state funder that they will assist us in the near future to obtain the information we need to determine our annual recidivism rate. We are looking forward to being able to have that information since it would not only be helpful in showing the positive effect of our programs, but would also give us a better picture with which to analyze what we do, what works, and what we need to revisit.

CEO/ED/Board Comments
The major challenge continues to be the lack of community awareness about the issues a very large part of our community's population faces due to the barriers one meets when released from incarceration.  OAR continues to try to address this lack of community awareness by taking every opportunity to meet with civic groups, community organizations, church groups, etc.  However, our goal this coming year is to become more "vocal" on social media about the crucial needs of the reentry population if we all want to improve the health and welfare of our community.  We are hoping that with increased public awareness, we will see increased funding for reentry services. 
Fiscal Year
Projected Revenue $1,092,683.00
Projected Expenses $1,092,683.00
Spending Policy Income Only
Form 990s
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$529,434$534,331$529,331
Federal------
State$406,234$534,331$529,331
Local$123,200----
Unspecified------
Individual Contributions$53,728$97,190$23,567
$55,500$111,000$111,000
------
Investment Income, Net of Losses$33,438$38$57
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind$19,249----
Other$305,424($14,129)$11,588
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$584,370$569,508$602,261
Administration Expense$61,669$71,733$55,398
Fundraising Expense$39,286$57,487$16,943
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.451.041.00
Program Expense/Total Expenses85%82%89%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue6%8%3%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$1,322,132$1,008,071$978,588
Current Assets$375,983$586,161$511,635
Long-Term Liabilities$0----
Current Liabilities$25,943$23,331$23,550
Total Net Assets$1,296,189$984,740$955,038
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities14.4925.1221.73
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? No
State Charitable Solicitaions Permit
Solicitations Permit
Solicitations Permit 11/2017View