Goodwill of Central and Coastal Virginia, Inc.
6301 Midlothian Turnpike
Richmond VA 23225-5707
Mission Statement Our mission is changing lives...helping people help themselves through the power of work.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mr. Charles D. Layman
Board Chair Mr. W. Scott Sims
Board Chair Company Affiliation Sandy Spring Bank
Contact Information
Address 6301 Midlothian Turnpike
Richmond, VA 232255707
Telephone 804 745-6300
Fax 804 276-6519
E-mail changinglives@goodwillvirginia.org
History and Background
Year of Incorporation 1946
Former Names
NameYear
Richmond Goodwill Industries, Inc.2004
Goodwill Industries of Central Virginia, Inc.2014
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Revenue $69,926.40
Projected Expenses $65,861,130.00
Additional Documents
Annual Report2014View
Annual Report2012View
Statements
Mission Our mission is changing lives...helping people help themselves through the power of work.
Impact

Goodwill's mission focuses on job placement, job training and job services that help unemployed and underemployed individuals in central and coastal Virginia. In 2015, we placed 2,602 individuals into employment throughout our communities, gained critical funding to launch our Hospitality Career Track and Customer Service Training programs, opened two new retail stores and employed over 1,300 associates.  

In 2016, we will continue to build and strengthen community partnerships to enhance our existing mission programs and services and to deepen our impact in the communities we serve.  In 2016, we will launch our Hospitality Career Track Training and Customer Service programs, open two new stores and begin the build out of our Community Employment Center at 1911 Saville Row.
Needs

 To help support our mission, we need:

  • Financial support for our job skills programs which are based on training and employer needs to include customer service, hospitality, janitorial, warehousing and technical (HVAC, Plumbing and Electrical).
  • A variety of donated goods – clothing, household items, computers and automobiles – to resell in our retail stores, outlets and at auction.
  • Financial support for  Job Developers to work with employers to open the way for individuals in skills development programs to have greater access to on the job training, employment opportunities and careers as well as connect to resources our community.
  • Employers to engage with our placement services.
  • Companies to join our computer recycling program by contributing old computers and office supplies for our e-recycle program.
  • Corporate clients to utilize our document destruction services and temporary staffing services.

 

Background
Goodwill of Central and Coastal Virginia, Inc. is part of a network of 165 community-based, autonomous member organizations in the United States, Canada, and 14 other countries that assist people with various obstacles to employment. Established in 1923, Goodwill currently serves the Central Virginia and Hampton Roads area by providing employment, job training and career services for individuals with barriers to employment including those with financial disadvantages and disabilities. We provide these services through training programs and our Goodwill Community Employment Centers (CEC).
 
To fund our mission, we collect donated goods – clothing, household items, computers and automobiles – to sell in our 32 retail stores, two outlets, two computer stores and at our weekly auction. Additionally we provide business enterprises to public and private organizations and government. Each business unit at Goodwill serves as front-line training ground for the development of job skills.
 
Over 84 percent of the revenues generated through our business units are channeled directly into programs tailored to meet our local communities' needs.
CEO Statement

Letter from the President & CEO and the Chair of the Board 

 
It is the work that adds dignity to a life. It is one’s work that gives the family hope. It is a hard day’s work that builds a future. And it is our work that strengthens our communities. That is the mission of Goodwill.
We see that power throughout our organization every day.  

It is in the growth of our organization- opening one new store in Powhatan and a new attended donation center in Sandbridge.

It is in the expansion of our government contracts in partnership with Goodwill of Charleston, South Carolina. It is in the collaboration with Thomas Nelson Community College to provide HVAC training in our Hampton support center.

It is in the over 1300 associates employed in Donated Goods programs, government and commercial contracts, workforce development programs and administrative support roles.  It is in the 18 volunteers on our Board of Directors and in the 15 volunteers on our Advisory Board that represent the community leadership and provide our governance.

It is in volume of donations topping 51 million pounds for this year- donations from our most generous communities.  It is through the over 3 million customer transactions in our retail stores and outlets.

It is seen through every dollar and every donor who gave to our Capital Campaign and Annual Fund efforts.  It is shown through our daily collaboration with multiple community partners.

It is evident every day in the individuals who walked through our doors or contacted our Community Employment Centers in 2015 seeking help to find a job. And it is proof in the job placement for over 2,602 people in a multitude of industries.

2015 was a year for us to begin to better define our work- the work that we do to sustain our mission as well as the work that we do to deliver our mission. Our collaboration with the community partners: employers, foundations, community colleges, and non-profits will continue to provide direction and tangible impact into 2016. As a social enterprise, Goodwill will continue to reinvest in  work that supports our fiscal health and our workforce; as a non-profit, Goodwill will continue to invest in work that builds our communities, collaborating with the right partners to create sustainable employment for those that need us most. 

It begins with work- with getting a job- and it ends with changing lives. And we can’t do it without you. Many thanks for believing in the power of work, through your support of our work in 2015.

Charles Layman, President and CEO 

Scott Sims, Chair of the Board 

 


Areas of Service
Areas Served
Area
Metro Richmond
Tri-cities Region
Richmond, City
Ashland
Chester
Chesterfield County
Colonial Heights, City
Dinwiddie County
Goochland County
Hanover County
Henrico County
Hopewell, City
Matoaka
Petersburg, City
Powhatan County
Prince George County
Sussex County
Charles City County
Gloucester County
King and Queen County
Lancaster County
Mathews County
Middlesex County
New Kent County
Westmoreland County
Westmoreland County
Westmoreland County
Dinwiddie County
Dinwiddie County
We serve 39 cities and counties throughout the communities of Central and Coastal Virginia. 
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. W. Scott Sims
Company Affiliation Sandy Spring Bank
Term Mar 2015 to Mar 2017
Email simsrichmond@comcast.net
Board of Directors
Board Members
NameAffiliation
Benjamin C. Ackerly Esq.Hunton & Williams
Ms. Lindsay Floyd Barden The Rappaport Companies
Mr. Bill Berkeley Deloitte
Mr. J. Morgan Davis TowneBank
Mr. Joe S. Frank David, Kamp & Frank, LLC
Mr. Thomas C. Kleine Troutman Sanders, LLP
Mr. Dave A. Modena firstSTREET
Mr. David Nelms Warren Whitney
Maria Rasmussen Esq.McGuire Woods
Mr. Christopher E. Rouzie Cushman & Wakefiled |Thalhimer
Mr. Brad Sauer C.F. Sauer Company
Mr. W. Scott Sims SunTrust Bank
Mrs. Donna Spurrier Spurrier Group
Mr. Richard S. Sutton Butler Lumber Company
Robert M. Tata Esq.Hunton and Williams
James W. Theobald Esq.Hirschler Fleischer
Shawnta Totten- Medley Esq.Dollar Tree, Inc.
Mr. Wesley H. Watkins Cherry, Bekaert Wealth Management
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 17
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 14
Female 4
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 4
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 78
Written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage Making Monetary Contributions 100
Percentage Making In-Kind Contributions 80
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Other Boards
The tables below contain information about other groups that advise this nonprofit on operations and projects.
Advisory Board Members
NameAffiliation
Mr. Brad Armstrong Armstrong Partners
Mr. Malcolm W. Bates CPMColliers International
David S. Cohn Esq.Community Volunteer
Mr. R. Russell Coleman Cherry Bekaert LLP
Mr. Alex J. Kay Jr.Philip Morris (Retired)
Mr. J. Charles Link Union First Market Bankshares (Retired)
Mr. Marc Lockhart MBL Enterprises, LLC
Mr. Tony Lovette The Specialty Group
Mr. Malcolm Randolph Community Volunteer
Mrs. Claire R. Shaffner Claire R. Shaffner Marketing
Mr. Daniel W. Simmons Community Volunteer
Mr. Thomas H. Tullidge Jr.Cary Street Partners, LLC
Mr. James E. Ukrop New Richmond Ventures
Mr. Gordon Wallace Fleet & Associates
Ms. Gail Welstead RNTravelers Insurance Company (Retired)
Mr. Daniel L. Williams Richmond Corrugated, Inc.
Executive Director
Executive Director Mr. Charles D. Layman
Former CEOs
NameTerm
Mr. Cecil McFarland 1977 - 1983
Senior Staff
NameTitle
Mr. Mark A. Barth Chief Information Officer
Ms. Andrea Butler Director of Development and Community Relations
Mr. William (Bill) F. Carlson Chief Operating Officer
Mr. John Dougherty VP, Community Workforce
Mr. Scott Warren Interim Chief Financial Officer
Staff
Full Time Staff 805
Part Time Staff 522
Volunteers 56
Contractors 3
Retention Rate 68
Plans
Organization has a Fundraising Plan? Yes
Organization has a Strategic Plan? Under Development
Years Strategic Plan Considers 3
Date Strategic Plan Adopted Dec 2014
Management Succession Plan? Under Development
Organization Policy and Procedures Yes
Nondiscrimination Policy Yes
Whistleblower Policy Yes
Document Destruction Policy Yes
Directors and Officers Insurance Policy Yes
Collaborations
Goodwill Industries serving the communities of Central Virginia and Hampton Roads enjoys a vast network of community and business partners throughout our entire footprint. Together we focus on our mission of changing lives... helping people help themselves through the power of work.
 
We collaborate with the community college system to include, retail, food services and HVAC and construction certification as well as services for veterans and military families. Goodwill joins forces with homeless, and battered women shelters to assist individuals with locating a safe place to live while preparing for work. Coordinating services with other nonprofit agencies addressing housing, transportation food and childcare, to provide holistic support for individuals in our communities. The partnerships formed to develop Goodwill's prisoner re-entry program are what make it a success. We have an extensive list of partner affiliates in both profit and non-profit sectors. 
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) - Employment and Community Services - 3 Year Accreditation2018
Programs
Description

Goodwill's Career Development Services provide unemployed and underemployed individuals with the training, education and resources they need to gain employment - at no cost to the job seeker. Services are delivered through Goodwill's 5 Community Employment Centers (CEC) and through its community partnership programs.   

The CECs offer easy access to the tools clients need for an effective job search including: resume and interview preparation, on-line application assistance, job leads, job fairs, career planning, vocational assessment, career management skills and re-entry workshops. The CEC’s have Resource Rooms with computers, internet access, telephones, fax and copier services. Community voicemail and e-mail accounts are available for individuals who are homeless or without a phone or computer.  Partnerships programs include, but are not limited to, on-the-job and classroom training in the industry sectors of food service, hospitality and retail.

 

Population Served Adults
Budget $2,010,985.00
Short Term Success  In 2015, Goodwill's Community Employment Centers served over 16,000 customers and placed more than 2,600 in competitive employment.
Long Term Success
Over five years
Description
goodChoiceFinancial Stability and Family Strengthening serves to fortify families by providing tools for education, financial stability and healthy relationships. goodChoice also operates as a conduit to resources and career opportunities in our community. 
 
While our core services are designed to give participants the skills and training needed to find a job and keep a job, we assist individuals with work-life balance through a holistic approach.  goodChoice is a natural extension of our mission goals and works in tandem with our CEC’s to ensure individuals have the comprehensive tools necessary to be successful.

The program provides regular financial education classes, coaches and case management by the staff at Goodwill. Our ultimate goals for program participants are financial stability and achievement of both their financial and career goals. A partnership between Richmond’s St James’s Episcopal Church, Goodwill and the local banking institutions, goodChoice has served more than 400 individuals since its inception in 2009.
Population Served Adults
Budget $108,984.00
Description

Goodwill's Vocational Services prepare individuals with disabilities and help them overcome employment barriers to become successful in the workplace.  Goodwill's six vocational services programs include:  

  • School-to Work
  • Ability One
  • Work Adjustment Training
  • Supported Employment  - Group and Individual
  • Transition to Independence and Employment


Population Served Adults
Budget $2,025,961.00
Fiscal Year
Projected Revenue $69,926.40
Projected Expenses $65,861,130.00
Spending Policy N/A
IRS Letter of Exemption
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201520142013
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
------
Government Contributions$2,099,465$2,773,417$2,518,006
Federal------
State------
Local------
Unspecified$2,099,465$2,773,417$2,518,006
Individual Contributions$2,143,016$2,035,826$1,246,421
$54,956$56,449$65,618
$26,373,056$25,220,193$26,552,268
Investment Income, Net of Losses$152,971$197,439$306,872
Membership Dues------
Special Events------
Revenue In-Kind$22,861,084$20,836,586$20,190,053
Other$239,018$1,157,049$742,107
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201520142013
Program Expense$42,567,962$41,108,152$41,750,426
Administration Expense$4,304,942$5,415,989$5,730,171
Fundraising Expense$229,723$259,975$274,821
Payments to Affiliates------
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.141.121.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses90%88%87%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue5%5%7%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201520142013
Total Assets$76,129,039$67,549,956$57,007,434
Current Assets$26,821,632$17,521,389$14,970,314
Long-Term Liabilities$29,659,079$27,888,360$23,956,639
Current Liabilities$5,030,542$4,815,663$3,158,227
Total Net Assets$41,439,418$34,845,933$29,892,568
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities5.333.644.74
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201520142013
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets39%41%42%
Capital Campaign
Currently in a Capital Campaign? Yes
Campaign Purpose This Capital Campaign covers Central Virginia and the Virginia Peninsula to support significant projects. The first is the renovation and build-out of a Community Employment Center on the Virginia Peninsula located at 1911 Saville Row in Hampton. The second is a major renovation of our Community Employment Center and main operations center at 6301 Midlothian Turnpike in Richmond. The dual renovation and remodeling will provide space to serve an additional 5,600 individuals annually, placing 1,000 more people into sustainable employment each year.
Goal $3,500,000.00
Dates June 2014 to Dec 2017
Amount Raised To Date $2,381,490.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? Yes
State Charitable Solicitaions Permit
Solicitations Permit
Solicitations Permit 1/2016View
Comments
Organization Comments
As the CEO for over 32 years, Charles Layman has directed the organization's growth from a budget of $1.7 million to $68 million and 1,300 employees. The growth of the mission delivery has increased from less than 100 individuals served in 1983 to over 20,000 individuals served in 2015. For his years of expertise and leadership, the board of directors established a retirement 457 (F) plan. The plan vested in 2015 when Mr. Layman turned 66 years old. Mr. Layman's total compensation on Schedule J includes the plan vesting total of $291, 647.
 
The board uses a variety of tools and resources to set compensation and guide policies. These include salary surveys from independent consultants (Titan Gallagher); peer standards in nonprofit, business and non-governmental organizations; other national Goodwills; and individuals performance and subject matter expertise. 
Foundation Comments
  • Audited financial statements prepared by Keiter.
  • Audited financial statements represent the financial position of Goodwill Industries of Central Virginia and their affiliate. 
  • IRS Form 990s represent the financial position of Goodwill Industries of Central Virginia.
  • Revenue from "Individuals" also includes corporate support.